Antinociceptive effect of palm date spathe hydroalcoholic extract on acute and chronic pain in mice as compared with analgesic effect of morphine and diclofenac

Peyghambari, F and Dashti-Rahmatabadi, MH and Rozabadi, MD and Rozabadi, RD and Rozabadi, FD and Pangalizadeh, M and Dehghanimohammadabadi, N (2015) Antinociceptive effect of palm date spathe hydroalcoholic extract on acute and chronic pain in mice as compared with analgesic effect of morphine and diclofenac. Adv Biomed Res.

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Abstract

BACKGROUNDS: In Persian traditional medicine, palm date spathe (PDS) is introduced as an analgesic. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the analgesic effect of hydroalcoholic extract of PDS on acute and chronic pain in mice in comparison with diclofenac and morphine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this study, which was conducted in summer 2014, 220 male mice (20-30 g) were randomly divided into two categories, each consists of 11 groups as follows: A normal control group, a solvent (Tween 80) control group, 3 morphine positive control groups (2, 4 and 8 mg/kg), 3 diclofenac positive control groups (10, 20 and 30 mg/kg), and 3 main experimental PDS groups (2, 20, and 200 mg/kg). Hot plate was applied on animals in one category and writing test on the other category to assess acute and chronic pain, respectively. RESULTS: In the writing test, the average writing time and number of animals receiving a maximum dosage of morphine, diclofenac, and PDS were significantly less than the control group. In the hot plate test, only groups receiving different doses of morphine at different time points and those received 30 mg/kg diclofenac at 15 min after the intervention showed significant difference with the control group. CONCLUSION: 200 mg/kg extract of PDS, revealed a significant analgesic effect on chronic pain, but it did not show any analgesic effect on acute pain.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Mic; pain; palm date; phoenix dactylifera; spathe
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Depositing User: azam bazrafshan bazrafshan
Date Deposited: 30 Dec 2015 05:43
Last Modified: 30 Dec 2015 05:43
URI: http://eprints.kmu.ac.ir/id/eprint/23752

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